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Delaware
Postsecondary Admission Requirements

Four-Year Institutions

Admission to Delaware’s two public universities is based on grades, class rank, test scores and recommendations from appropriate high school officials. Applicants to the University of Delaware and Delaware State University must complete a required high school curriculum. Delaware State University requires a grade-point average of 2.0 or better in core academic subjects. 

Delaware Universities: Required and Recommended High School Curricula

Subject

University of Delaware

Delaware State University

 

Required

Recommended

Required

Recommended

English

4

4

4

4

Math

3

4

3

4

Science

3

4

3

3

History/ Social Studies

4

4

3

4

Foreign Language

2

4

2

2

Electives

2

2

4

4

Total

18

20-22

19

21

Course Requirements

University of Delaware
  • Science: Applicants may substitute a fourth year of math or science for the fourth unit of social science. For the required curriculum, at least two of three science units must include a lab component.
  • Social Studies: Applicants must complete two units in history. World history is required.
  • Foreign Language: Applicants must take the two required units in the same language.
  • Other: Applicants must take specific courses if they plan to enter a STEM major.
Delaware State University
  • English: Writing, Literature and Oral Communication
  • Math: Algebra I and II, Geometry or the equivalent
  • Social Studies: Applicants must complete two units in history. World history is required.
  • Science: Applicants must complete one or more of the following: biology, chemistry, physics.
  • Foreign Language: University recommends that applicants take units in same language.
  • Electives: Allowable units include core subjects, art, theatre, music, and/or computer science.

Delaware State University also requires a minimum SAT score of 800 or 17 ACT Composite score.

Two-Year and/or Technical Colleges

Delaware Technical Community College students must have a high school diploma or GED credential, or they must be 18 years old and pass institutional tests that demonstrate their ability to benefit from instruction.

Applicants must possess a high school diploma or an equivalency credential if they want to apply for financial aid and/or admission to selective programs of study. Students not seeking state and federal financial assistance can take the SAT or ACCUPLACER to demonstrate ability to benefit from postsecondary instruction.

Post

Arkansas
Postsecondary Admission Requirements

Four-Year Institutions

Students must have a high school diploma or GED credential. For unconditional admission, students must complete the “Smart Core” high school curriculum requirements with a minimum grade-point average of 2.0. While parents may waive their child’s participation in the “Smart Core,” opting out could result in conditional admission and ineligibility for state financial aid.

State law authorizes institutions to admit applicants on a conditional basis. These students receive full admission once they complete 12 hours of core academic courses with a cumulative GPA of 2.0.

Two-Year and/or Technical Colleges

Applicants must possess a high school diploma or an equivalency credential. While community and technical colleges are open-access institutions, admission does not guarantee entry into specific academic programs. State rules require technical colleges to develop procedures to determine whether students are able to benefit from instruction.  

Post

Alabama
Postsecondary Admission Requirements

Four-Year Institutions

Common, statewide admissions requirements do not exist for four-year institutions. Institutional governing boards set admission requirements.

Two-Year and/or Technical Colleges

For admission to associate degree programs, students must show that they have completed a high school diploma or an equivalent credential. Students applying to vocational programs must demonstrate an ability to benefit from instruction.

Overview

Postsecondary Feedback to High Schools

Statewide policies govern postsecondary feedback reports to high schools. These contain information such as college enrollment rates and performance of recent graduates. These reports help to influence K-12 education policies and inform schools on whether they are adequately preparing graduates for postsecondary endeavors. (Updated August 2019)

Overview

State Financial Aid for Undergraduates

States provide different types and amounts of aid to undergraduate students for postsecondary education. State financial aid typically falls under three categories: merit-based, need-based and non-grant-based. Merit aid is usually awarded for a student’s academic achievements in high school, as well as for special talents and unique traits, such as musical or athletic skills. Need-based aid is usually reserved for low-income students, and non-grant aid includes loan and work study programs. Most SREB states allocate more funding to merit-based aid. See below for each state’s financial aid provisions. (Updated August 2019)

Overview

Postsecondary Placement Policies

Placement policies are set by individual institutions or at the state-level, sometimes by institution type. Institutions use placement policies to determine whether students are permitted to take college-credit courses or are required to take remedial courses. Factors considered in student placement include standardized exam score submissions, placement plans, and college-level coursework completed during high school. See below for each state’s postsecondary placement policies. (Updated August 2019)

Overview

Postsecondary Admissions Requirements

Admission policies are set either at the state level, by an institutional governing board, or by individual institutions. Policies may also vary by institution type, such as four-year and two-year technical schools. Admissions requirements may include high school courses, high school grade-point average, and standardized exam score submissions. See below for each state’s postsecondary admissions requirements. (Updated August 2019)

Overview

Accelerated Learning Options in High School

Accelerated learning options provide students the opportunity to take college-level and career technical courses while in high school, sometimes for college credit. Options include dual enrollment and dual credit courses, early college enrollment, Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate courses and credit by exam. See below for each state’s accelerated learning options. (Updated August 2019)

Overview

High School Graduation Requirements

Requirements for the standard high school diploma vary across states. Differences include required coursework and credit minimums, diploma pathway options and designations or endorsements, high school assessments and related scores. (Updated August 2019)

Overview

College and Career Planning in K-12

To help students prepare for college or a career by the end of high school, many SREB states have implemented college- and career-planning measures that begin as early as sixth grade. These include activities such as student success or graduation planning, meeting with advisors, tutoring, mentoring, and exploring possible careers. Many states have programs aimed at supporting underserved groups such as minority and low-income students who traditionally struggle to succeed in high school. See below for each state’s college and career planning policies. (Updated July 2019)