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Teacher Career Continuum

Today, many schools struggle to find good teachers and keep them in the profession. One way states can address this problem is to focus policies for each stage in the profession’s career continuum. 

Teacher Candidate. Early Career Teacher. Professional Teacher. Teacher Leader.

When states recognize these distinct needs, educators can grow more effective and be compensated for improving. Aligning policies across the continuum also signals that teaching is a profession with an attractive career path.

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The Georgia Residency for Educating Amazing Teachers Program

You get excited about things like robotics, rockets, hurricanes and sea turtles — and you love showing children how they can put geometry and algebra to work in cool STEM careers.

Why not share your skills with middle grades students?  If you enjoy working with children and have a strong background in STEM, you can get paid while you earn a teaching degree!

If you’ve been working in a science, technology, engineering or math field and are interested in teaching, the Georgia Residency for Educating Amazing Teachers (GREAT) program will help you make the transition if you have a bachelor’s degree in a STEM-related field.

About GREAT

A partnership between SREB and Georgia College & State University, GREAT is funded by the Teacher Quality Partnership program of the U.S. Department of Education.

In the GREAT program, you’ll gain classroom teaching experience under the guidance of a mentor teacher while completing an online 36-credit Master of Arts in Teaching at GCSU — all while earning a first-year teacher’s salary and full health care benefits.

GREAT resident teachers will be placed in middle grades classrooms in grades six through eight in central Georgia. Upon successfully completing the residency, you’ll be hired by the district where you served. Residents must pay GCSU tuition and fees and agree to teach for a minimum of three years.

How to Apply

Applicants must:

  • Hold a bachelor’s degree in math, science or a STEM field or expect to graduate with a bachelor’s degree in one of these fields in or by the spring of 2020 OR
  • Demonstrate professional experience in a STEM career field and hold a bachelor’s degree in any field with a minimum of nine undergraduate credit hours in math and nine in science AND
  • Have earned an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.75

To apply:

  1. Visit Georgia College & State University on the web.
  2. Apply online to the Summer 2020 Master of Arts in Teaching in Middle Grades program in the College of Education.
  3. Check the box for the GREAT program in the online application.
  4. Apply by the GREAT deadline of March 15, 2020.

Questions about applying? Contact Shanda Brand at shanda.brand@gcsu.edu or 478-445-1383.

Learn more about GREAT by contacting:

Download our informational flyer.

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Building Critical Math Skills in the Early Grades

Teacher and elementary school students solve math problems at a whiteboard

When children in primary grades study math, they are learning more than how to add, subtract, multiply and divide numbers. Solving math problems helps students develop strong analytical and problem-solving skills that are vital for academic and personal success. In Early Math Matters, SREB explores why early math is so important and provides recommendations on how state leaders can raise the math achievement of their students.

The report examines how:

Blog post Samantha DurranceSREB Policy Analyst

Why Do We Say “I’m Bad at Math”?
How math anxiety affects performance, and what we can do about it

We’ve all likely heard someone say, “I’m bad at math,” or even “I hate math.” In the United States, math is too often considered a subject that either comes naturally or doesn’t — there are “math people,” and everyone else can expect to struggle with it. If you stop and think, though, this makes as much sense as saying we’re all naturally good (or bad) at sports, or music, or writing. It’s true that becoming skilled in any of these areas may come more easily to some people than others, but we generally understand that no one becomes expert at baseball without learning the game and spending a lot of time practicing.

Publication November 20194 pages

State Efforts to Promote Teacher Leadership

In the face of teacher shortages, state leaders have an opportunity to explore ways of remaking the teaching profession from the inside out, rather than relying solely on short-term solutions. One strategy for addressing this pervasive problem involves implementing teacher leadership and mentorship initiatives. This brief highlights how education leaders in six states used three levers – certification, pay and recognition – to identify, deploy and retain teacher leaders.

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Publication November 201913 pages

Educator Preparation Program Accountability in Selected States

SREB conducted research on how states create performance accountability systems for teacher education programs. This brief describes how states go about developing performance measures and creating public report cards. The document’s appendix includes program accountability profiles for all SREB states and nine additional states.

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Publication October 20194 pages

Alternative Certification Pathways in SREB States
Summary of State Requirements

All SREB states provide alternative routes to teacher certification, however the strategies for approving nontraditional pathways vary from state to state. This brief provides 10 examples of alternative certification programs in eight SREB states and includes recommendations policymakers should consider when designing or approving alternative certification programs.

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Blog post Megan BorenSREB Program Specialist

How Can a Roundtable on Education Human Capital Help Your State?

Another school year has started, and nearly every state in the SREB region is facing major human capital challenges including teacher shortages. Schools now face shortages not only in STEM courses and special education but in most subject areas.

Publication September 2019 | 20 pages

Shared-Time Technology Centers
A Study of Six State Funding Systems

Shared-Time Technology Centers: A Study of Six State Funding Systems. Special Report for the Kentucky Career and Technical Education Task Force Southern Regional Education Board.  SREB.org. September 2019

Students need learning experiences connected with the world of work to equip them to enter the workforce and secure good jobs. This report provides an overview of funding for career and technical education and a detailed look at CTE funding models in Arkansas, Indiana, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina and West Virginia. Produced by SREB for the Kentucky Career and Technical Education Task Force, it also offers considerations for actions to improve CTE.

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