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Blog post Anna Hasenkamp, Guest Blogger

Raise the Rigor
Strategies to Promote Reading Comprehension

Q-Chart

Anna Hasenkamp

As a middle grades social studies teacher in Florence School District 1 — an area of South Carolina along I-95 known as the “Corridor of Shame” for its poverty and low-performing students — I have a theory. I believe all students benefit from rigorous, literacy-based classroom instruction, and students from poverty benefit the most. The ability to read and understand complex texts is the best way to distinguish students who are college and career ready from those who are not.

Blog post Dave Madden, Guest Blogger

Seven Literacy-Based Assignments for Social Studies Classrooms

Bodies of Water graphic

Dave Madden

Last year, while teaching at Lakeside Middle School in Anderson County, South Carolina, my colleague Keri Compton and I came up with seven strategies specifically for social studies teachers. These mini-tasks, based on our Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC) training, use hands-on activities to build confidence and help students reflect on their learning while they’re improving their reading and writing skills. Here they are:

People, Objects, Settings, Engagement and Relationships

Blog post Samantha Durrance, SREB Policy Analyst

Diverse needs create a challenge for kindergarten teachers
How can states help their kindergarten teachers meet students where they are and boost learning for all?

Kindergarten is an important transition to the early grades. In fact, more and more teachers say kindergarten is the new first grade. Recent research by Bassok, Latham and Rorem backs this up. In 2016, these researchers examined differences in kindergarten expectations and teaching practices between 1998 and 2010.

News SREB News Release

Mississippi, Arkansas Educators Win National Readiness Awards
Outstanding leadership in improving college readiness for high school students

Marla Davis, Mississippi Department of Education

Four educators were honored this week for their work to help underprepared students succeed in high school and postsecondary studies. Mary Zluticky of Horn Lake High School in Mississippi, Phil Wesson of Sheridan High in Arkansas, and Marla Davis and Jean Massey of the Mississippi Department of Education won SREB awards.

Blog post Ansley Abraham, Director, SREB-State Doctoral Scholars Program

Why supporting doctoral students of color is more important than ever

Group photo: attendees of the Institute on Teaching and Mentoring

Twenty-five years ago, the South was graduating so few Ph.D. students of color that, in some fields, the annual number of graduates could fit into the same car.

Fortunately that has changed, but not enough to graduate all the scholars of color we need.

Blog post Samantha Durrance, SREB Policy Analyst

Are teachers prepared to teach reading?
Research shows a gap between what we know about reading and how teachers are prepared to teach it

Reading is the foundation for learning.

The research is clear: Students who are not reading proficiently by the end of third grade are much more likely to face poor academic outcomes. For this reason alone, we know it is incredibly important that children learn to read well early in elementary school and continue to build on those reading skills throughout the rest of school.

News SREB News Release

Educators Win 2017 LDC, MDC Awards at National Conference

Rankin County Mississippi educators

These teachers, trainers, schools and districts were honored for their implementation of the Literacy Design Collaborative and Mathematics Design Collaborative frameworks at SREB’s College- and Career-Readiness Standards Networking Conference July 10, 2017, in Nashville, Tennessee.