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Blog post Ansley Abraham, Director, SREB-State Doctoral Scholars Program

Why supporting doctoral students of color is more important than ever

Group photo: attendees of the Institute on Teaching and Mentoring

Twenty-five years ago, the South was graduating so few Ph.D. students of color that, in some fields, the annual number of graduates could fit into the same car.

Fortunately that has changed, but not enough to graduate all the scholars of color we need.

Blog post Samantha Durrance, SREB Policy Analyst

Diverse needs create a challenge for kindergarten teachers
How can states help their kindergarten teachers meet students where they are and boost learning for all?

Kindergarten is an important transition to the early grades. In fact, more and more teachers say kindergarten is the new first grade. Recent research by Bassok, Latham and Rorem backs this up. In 2016, these researchers examined differences in kindergarten expectations and teaching practices between 1998 and 2010.

Blog post Dave Madden, Guest Blogger

Seven Literacy-Based Assignments for Social Studies Classrooms

Bodies of Water graphic

Dave Madden

Last year, while teaching at Lakeside Middle School in Anderson County, South Carolina, my colleague Keri Compton and I came up with seven strategies specifically for social studies teachers. These mini-tasks, based on our Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC) training, use hands-on activities to build confidence and help students reflect on their learning while they’re improving their reading and writing skills. Here they are:

People, Objects, Settings, Engagement and Relationships

Blog post Anna Hasenkamp, Guest Blogger

Raise the Rigor
Strategies to Promote Reading Comprehension

Q-Chart

Anna Hasenkamp

As a middle grades social studies teacher in Florence School District 1 — an area of South Carolina along I-95 known as the “Corridor of Shame” for its poverty and low-performing students — I have a theory. I believe all students benefit from rigorous, literacy-based classroom instruction, and students from poverty benefit the most. The ability to read and understand complex texts is the best way to distinguish students who are college and career ready from those who are not.

Blog post Lauri Johnson, SREB Director of School Leader Development

Math and Literacy Teaching Strategies Have Deep, Lasting Effect

Want to see where good teaching happens? Watch what students are doing in the classroom. Sounds obvious, maybe, but as SREB senior vice president Gene Bottoms says, “We observe teachers and what they’re doing all the time — but we miss a big piece of the puzzle if we don’t see what the kids are doing as a result.”

So SREB asked My Student Survey to see how our training in powerful literacy and math teaching tools is paying off in the classroom.

Blog post Samantha Durrance, SREB Policy Analyst

Are teachers prepared to teach reading?
Research shows a gap between what we know about reading and how teachers are prepared to teach it

Reading is the foundation for learning.

The research is clear: Students who are not reading proficiently by the end of third grade are much more likely to face poor academic outcomes. For this reason alone, we know it is incredibly important that children learn to read well early in elementary school and continue to build on those reading skills throughout the rest of school.

Blog post Gene BottomsSenior Vice President, SREB

West Virginia: Leading-Edge Career-Tech Showcased in The New York Times
State's partnerships with SREB go far beyond adoption of Advanced Career Energy and Power pathway.

Photo of a female CTE student operating a drill press.

A recent article in The New York Times describes how West Virginia’s career and technical education programs are preparing students for degrees and careers in the state’s high-tech, high-demand industries. “Far from being strictly a job training program for teenagers, classes like Advanced Career Energy and Power require math and physics instruction as rigorous as in the College Board’s Advanced Placement track.”

Here are six ways the state partners with SREB in CTE and readiness.

Blog post Kim Anderson, Director, and Mary Elizabeth Mira, Assistant Director, SREB's Benchmarking College- and Career-Readiness Standards Project

Heavy Lift
Aligning Classroom Materials to State Standards

Report cover: Alignment of Instructional Materials: Trends in State Efforts,

SREB report can serve as a guide as work continues

Big changes don’t happen overnight. And when states adopted higher education standards, it was only the first step in a long-term effort to improve schools so all students graduate high school with what they need to be ready for college and careers.

Next came the complex work of implementing the standards. Schools needed textbooks, curricula and lesson plans designed with the new standards in mind. Teachers needed training to shift their classroom strategies to help students meet the readiness standards.

Blog post Wanda BarkerDirector, Educational Technology Cooperative

Arkansas Schools Exceed Federal Broadband Connectivity Goals

Congratulations to the Arkansas Department of Education for its broadband connectivity accomplishments! Arkansas is now one of only six states in the nation that have met the federal target for high-speed broadband in every public school.

Blog post Samantha Durrance

Reading in the Early Grades
How can we ensure reading proficiency by the end of third grade?

It’s no secret that reading skills are essential for success, both as a student and later in life. And educators know that reading proficiently by the end of third grade is crucial to students’ continued development. Up until third grade students learn to read; after that, they read to learn. It is paramount that students read proficiently by the end of third grade so they are prepared for later learning.

Blog post Kirsten SundellDirector, Product Development and Communications, Career Pathways

SREB States Lead the Way on Computer Science Education
Inside InfoSys Foundation's National Computer Science Education Convening

National convening attendees share best practices for increasing access to quality CS learning experiences

Last month I was privileged to participate in InfoSys Foundation’s CrossRoads 2017 convening on computer science and maker education in San Francisco. The convening’s attendee list included state and local government representatives, thought leaders, K-12 educators, postsecondary faculty and not-for-profit computing organizations from across the US — including many SREB states.

Blog post Tim Shaughnessy, Developer, Career Pathway Programs of Study

Kentucky Students Can Earn Degree Faster With New Nursing Career Pathway

Most if not all SREB states have a serious, unmet need for registered nurses with Bachelor of Science in Nursing degrees  — the preferred credential of many health-care providers. Here’s how Kentucky health-care industry leaders and secondary and postsecondary health educators designed a new, 120-credit hour nursing career pathway in a state where the pathway from high school to the BSN could take up to 168 credit hours — 48 costly excess hours.

Blog post Chanell Turner

“He Always Said What Needed to Be Said…”

Charlie Reed and Dave Spence

Chanell Turner, Publications and Programming Assistant for the Doctoral Scholars Program, talks with former SREB President Mark Musick as he remembers former SREB Vice Chair Charlie Reed’s impact on the Doctoral Scholars Program and his passion for education.

Blog post Matia Edwards

Out-of-state education at in-state tuition rates: A student’s experience with the Academic Common Market

Here’s a tricky scenario many rising college students face: The degree program they want to pursue is not available in their state, and out-of-state tuition is not affordable. Many are seeking postsecondary options with lower tuition.

SREB’s Academic Common Market helps students pursue out-of-state college degrees at in-state tuition rates from more than 1,900 undergrad and grad degree programs in 15 states. And SREB has been doing this for over 35 years.

Blog post Gene Bottoms

Accelerating Postsecondary Attainment – in High School

Gene Bottoms, Senior Vice President of SREB

Gene Bottoms explains why and how the new High Schools That Work model gives seniors a head start on a credential or degree.

Since the 1970s, the educational and economic landscapes of the United States have undergone seismic shifts along the fault line of postsecondary attainment.

Blog post Gene Bottoms

Preparing Students for Tomorrow’s Challenges

Preparing students for good-paying, middle-class jobs in the 21st-century economy is going to take more innovation, creativity, steadfastness and hard work on the part of schools, principals, teachers, counselors and students. A new approach to education is needed to prepare students for new technology, rising workplace requirements and stiffer competition.