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Blog post Cena DavisSREB School Improvement Leadership Coach

Online Professional Development Support for Educators

woman working at  a laptopAs we enter our second and third weeks of school closures and social distancing, I am amazed and proud of our educators. I see school systems scrambling to feed children. I see teachers preparing lessons, packets and online resources. I see principals giving weekly messages, reading bedtime stories online, leading virtual parades and calling every teacher for weekly check-ins. I see heroes. But to be quite honest, I saw these heroes before the advent of COVID-19.

Right now, our teachers need extra support.

Blog post Amanda MerrittSREB School Improvement Instructional Coach

Navigating the Road of E-learning

teacher taking notes while sitting at a laptop

The last two weeks have certainly required flexibility, innovation and problem-solving for educators not just in SREB states but across the nation and the world. Those of us at SREB who support teachers and district- and school-based coaches have been flooded with emails, texts and phone calls asking for help. In an effort to support all of you from afar, we offer some tips and strategies for how you can navigate the road of e-learning.

Blog post Scott WarrenSREB division director

Virtual Labs for STEM and CTE Teachers and Students

scott warren headshot

We know that this is a challenging time for teachers across the country. Many of you have been plunged into the world of virtual learning without a lot of time to prepare. Following sudden school closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic, you’ve had to move quickly to shift your carefully planned lessons online so your students can continue learning at home.  And those of you who are STEM and career and technical education teachers in particular face unique challenges as you work to adapt hands-on learning experiences to a virtual format.  

Blog post Meagan Crowe SREB Policy Analyst

A Path to College and Career
Stepping Stones for States

A thriving economy and a workforce prepared for it will increasingly demand that more adults earn postsecondary credentials. Ensuring that students successfully move from middle grades into high school, then into college or technical education programs, is critical if states hope to boost their adult educational attainment levels.

Blog post Stephen L. PruittSREB President

Thank Goodness for Mississippi
Star NAEP Showing Follows a Long Commitment

4th Grade NAEP Reading, Percentage Scoring At or Above Proficient in Mississippi. MS18% (2005) 32% (2019); SREB 28% 2005, 32% (2019); US 30% 2005, 34% 2019)

“Thank goodness for Mississippi.”

It used to be that this was something you heard from people who were grateful that Mississippi kept their own states from the dubious honor of last place in education rankings. Those folks may not have noticed that, since 2005, Mississippi has been making steady gains.

And now, after Mississippi offered a rare bright spot on the Nation’s Report Card earlier this month, we have a new reason to be thankful for Mississippi: We can learn from their success.

Real progress takes time.

Blog post Megan BorenSREB Program Specialist

How Can a Roundtable on Education Human Capital Help Your State?

Another school year has started, and nearly every state in the SREB region is facing major human capital challenges including teacher shortages. Schools now face shortages not only in STEM courses and special education but in most subject areas.

Blog post Meagan Crowe SREB Policy Analyst

Effective Adult Education Programs: A Challenge for States

States face an uphill battle in meeting the needs of adult learners, especially at a time when technology is advancing rapidly. Adults can turn to adult education programs to improve their skills, but enrollments have fallen in recent years.

Blog post Matthew SmithSREB Research Associate

Using Data to Transform Teacher Preparation

The SREB Teacher Preparation Commission has called on state leaders to build data systems that will improve preparation programs. The commission identified three groups that would benefit from robust and accessible data:

  • Individuals choosing where to enroll
  • Preparation providers interested in improving their strategies
  • Policymakers considering changes to state requirements

View our webinar on this topic. 

Blog post Meagan CroweSREB Policy Analyst

Adapting Education, Keeping Pace with Automation

Technology is advancing at unprecedented rates. Though there have been grand transformations in information technologies, including computers, cell phones, automated services and customer-facing machines, these changes will likely be dwarfed by others in the coming decades. Automated vehicles and artificial intelligence have the capacity to reshape not only our workforce but our social and political systems. Machine learning will create work tasks in the future that can only be imagined today.

Blog post David RaneySREB Chief Editor

Joan Lord Retires

Joan Lord

Joan Lord has always put the and in “policy and practice.” In nearly twenty years at SREB, Lord has overseen policy research and analysis, worked with her share of policy commissions, and written innumerable policy briefs and recommendations, always with the second half of the pair — practice — firmly in mind. Policy is not, to her mind, an empty intellectual exercise but an action plan, a living document to improve the region’s education from top to bottom.

Blog post Jon Schmidt-DavisSREB Senior Research Associate

The Eisenhower Matrix: A Tool to Help School Leaders Focus Their Time

The Eisenhower Matrix can help busy leaders make the most of their limited time to get things done. During World War II the matrix helped General Dwight Eisenhower plan and carry out the most complex military operation in history, the D-Day invasion of Normandy. He used it as a tool to ensure that he spent his time on the right work.

Blog post David RaneySREB Chief Editor

Automation: Changing Jobs For Generations

Workforce changes are coming quickly, across the nation and especially in the South. In fact, they’re already here. Education and training across the SREB region will need to respond just as quickly to avoid severe economic outcomes.

Blog post Matthew Smith | SREB Research Associate

Spotlight on Clinical Experiences
How State Leaders Could Support High-Quality Clinical Practice

The SREB Teacher Preparation Commission called on state leaders to consider ways to improve the quality of teacher candidates’ classroom experiences. After consulting the research, Commission members learned that the length of a clinical experience is less important than ensuring that candidates are supported by effective mentors and supervised by university faculty who have experience in the classroom.

Blog post Samantha DurranceSREB Policy Analyst

Giving Elementary Teachers the Tools to Teach Math Well
Broad preparation can leave math-specific knowledge lacking

Graph with percentages of teachers with a degree in math or math education in 2018.

Math cartoon - "Just a darn minute -- yesterday your said that X equals two!" It’s no secret that aspiring teachers with strong math backgrounds tend to be drawn toward the secondary grades, where they can just teach math. In fact, results of the 2018 National Survey of Science and Math Education showed that just 3 percent of elementary teachers surveyed held a degree in mathematics or math education, compared with 45 percent of middle grades math teachers and 79 percent of high school math teachers.

Blog post Megan BorenSREB Program Specialist

Educator Effectiveness is About Learning and Growth Opportunities
And that should never end

Lessons learned from three years of work in 8 states

Providing real-time feedback and growth opportunities to teachers — the real purpose of educator effectiveness systems — means that school leaders have to understand and value the skills to be instructional leaders and be properly trained on those skills. In any career path, professionals need to know how they’re doing and need help honing their craft. Teaching is no different; teachers need a coach, they need feedback.

Blog post Samantha DurranceSREB Policy Analyst

Why Do We Say “I’m Bad at Math”?
How math anxiety affects performance, and what we can do about it

We’ve all likely heard someone say, “I’m bad at math,” or even “I hate math.” In the United States, math is too often considered a subject that either comes naturally or doesn’t — there are “math people,” and everyone else can expect to struggle with it. If you stop and think, though, this makes as much sense as saying we’re all naturally good (or bad) at sports, or music, or writing. It’s true that becoming skilled in any of these areas may come more easily to some people than others, but we generally understand that no one becomes expert at baseball without learning the game and spending a lot of time practicing.

Blog post Dr. Ansley Abraham, DirectorSREB State-Doctoral Scholars Program

Fixing the Pipeline of Possibility

A recent Atlantic article, “The Disciplines Where No Black People Earn Ph.D.s,” is eye-opening for its title alone. “In 2017,” author Adam Harris says, “there were more than a dozen fields” — largely within STEM — “in which not a single doctoral degree was awarded to a black person anywhere in the United States.”

Blog post Jeffrey Grove, SREB Research Associate

Update on Final Legislative Actions in VA, WV

While the first and second Legislative Report issues of the year are focused on gubernatorial budget proposals, several SREB states have already completed their 2019 regular legislative sessions — the first ones across the finish line being Virginia and West Virginia. Here is a brief summary of final actions in both states; we’ll have full write-ups on final actions in all 16 SREB states in coming blog posts and Legislative Report editions.

Blog post Matthew Smith, SREB Research Associate

Getting the Balance Right
Reconsidering the Mix of Teacher Licensure Measures

The SREB Teacher Preparation Commission called on state leaders to adopt practice-based assessments. These tests assess candidates’ readiness to lead a classroom and to apply lessons learned during coursework and clinical experiences.

Practice-based assessments have diagnostic value, meaning they provide performance data that educator preparation programs can use to identify strengths and opportunities for improvement. State agencies could use the assessment data to determine how they will provide technical assistance to preparation programs.