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Blog post David RaneySREB Chief Editor

Joan Lord Retires

Joan Lord

Joan Lord has always put the and in “policy and practice.” In nearly twenty years at SREB, Lord has overseen policy research and analysis, worked with her share of policy commissions, and written innumerable policy briefs and recommendations, always with the second half of the pair — practice — firmly in mind. Policy is not, to her mind, an empty intellectual exercise but an action plan, a living document to improve the region’s education from top to bottom.

Blog post Jon Schmidt-DavisSREB Senior Research Associate Kirsten Sundell

The Eisenhower Matrix: A Tool to Help School Leaders Focus Their Time

The Eisenhower Matrix can help busy leaders make the most of their limited time to get things done. During World War II the matrix helped General Dwight Eisenhower plan and carry out the most complex military operation in history, the D-Day invasion of Normandy. He used it as a tool to ensure that he spent his time on the right work.

Blog post David RaneySREB Chief Editor

Automation: Changing Jobs For Generations

Workforce changes are coming quickly, across the nation and especially in the South. In fact, they’re already here. Education and training across the SREB region will need to respond just as quickly to avoid severe economic outcomes.

Blog post Matthew Smith | SREB Research Associate

Spotlight on Clinical Experiences
How State Leaders Could Support High-Quality Clinical Practice

The SREB Teacher Preparation Commission called on state leaders to consider ways to improve the quality of teacher candidates’ classroom experiences. After consulting the research, Commission members learned that the length of a clinical experience is less important than ensuring that candidates are supported by effective mentors and supervised by university faculty who have experience in the classroom.

Blog post Samantha DurranceSREB Policy Analyst

Giving Elementary Teachers the Tools to Teach Math Well
Broad preparation can leave math-specific knowledge lacking

Graph with percentages of teachers with a degree in math or math education in 2018.

Math cartoon - "Just a darn minute -- yesterday your said that X equals two!" It’s no secret that aspiring teachers with strong math backgrounds tend to be drawn toward the secondary grades, where they can just teach math. In fact, results of the 2018 National Survey of Science and Math Education showed that just 3 percent of elementary teachers surveyed held a degree in mathematics or math education, compared with 45 percent of middle grades math teachers and 79 percent of high school math teachers.

Blog post Megan BorenSREB Program Specialist

Educator Effectiveness is About Learning and Growth Opportunities
And that should never end

Lessons learned from three years of work in 8 states

Providing real-time feedback and growth opportunities to teachers — the real purpose of educator effectiveness systems — means that school leaders have to understand and value the skills to be instructional leaders and be properly trained on those skills. In any career path, professionals need to know how they’re doing and need help honing their craft. Teaching is no different; teachers need a coach, they need feedback.

Blog post Samantha DurranceSREB Policy Analyst

Why Do We Say “I’m Bad at Math”?
How math anxiety affects performance, and what we can do about it

We’ve all likely heard someone say, “I’m bad at math,” or even “I hate math.” In the United States, math is too often considered a subject that either comes naturally or doesn’t — there are “math people,” and everyone else can expect to struggle with it. If you stop and think, though, this makes as much sense as saying we’re all naturally good (or bad) at sports, or music, or writing. It’s true that becoming skilled in any of these areas may come more easily to some people than others, but we generally understand that no one becomes expert at baseball without learning the game and spending a lot of time practicing.

Blog post Dr. Ansley Abraham, DirectorSREB State-Doctoral Scholars Program

Fixing the Pipeline of Possibility

A recent Atlantic article, “The Disciplines Where No Black People Earn Ph.D.s,” is eye-opening for its title alone. “In 2017,” author Adam Harris says, “there were more than a dozen fields” — largely within STEM — “in which not a single doctoral degree was awarded to a black person anywhere in the United States.”

Blog post Jeffrey Grove, SREB Research Associate

Update on Final Legislative Actions in VA, WV

While the first and second Legislative Report issues of the year are focused on gubernatorial budget proposals, several SREB states have already completed their 2019 regular legislative sessions — the first ones across the finish line being Virginia and West Virginia. Here is a brief summary of final actions in both states; we’ll have full write-ups on final actions in all 16 SREB states in coming blog posts and Legislative Report editions.

Blog post Matthew Smith, SREB Research Associate

Getting the Balance Right
Reconsidering the Mix of Teacher Licensure Measures

The SREB Teacher Preparation Commission called on state leaders to adopt practice-based assessments. These tests assess candidates’ readiness to lead a classroom and to apply lessons learned during coursework and clinical experiences.

Practice-based assessments have diagnostic value, meaning they provide performance data that educator preparation programs can use to identify strengths and opportunities for improvement. State agencies could use the assessment data to determine how they will provide technical assistance to preparation programs.

Blog post Wanda BarkerDirector, Education Technology Cooperative

Cyberattacks: Helping Schools Fight Back

Nearly 60 percent of U.S. school districts report cyberattacks infrequently — every month or less, according to a recent Consortium for School Networking report. But in November, David Couch, K-12 Chief Information Officer at the Kentucky Department of Education, made a startling announcement. Couch told the SREB Legislative Advisory Council that he’d seen over 4 billion attempted cyber-attacks in one year in his state.

Blog post Matthew SmithSREB Research Associate

In This Together: How States Foster Safe Learning Environments

As legislatures convene regular sessions, we at SREB have observed an uptick in bills focused on school safety. Some propose dramatic changes in the way school districts hire and train security personnel, develop emergency plans, or address students’ mental and emotional health. Others make technical changes to standing laws in order to lower the barriers districts face in creating safe learning environments.

Blog post Dr. Robert (Bob) Belle, Associate Director, SREB-State Doctoral Scholars Program

Reflecting on 25 years
of the Institute on Teaching and Mentoring

Dr. Robert (Bob) Belle poses for a photo behind a microphone.

As one of only three people who have attended every Institute on Teaching and Mentoring, Dr. Robert (Bob) Belle, the longtime associate director of the SREB-State Doctoral Scholars Program, reflects on the Institute’s growth and importance, marking the 25th year of the conference.

Blog post Tiffany K. HarrisonSREB Research Associate

National Cyber Security Awareness Month

Technology security is a global issue for education, government, military, business and private individuals. Each October, the topic is highlighted to bring attention to the issue.

According to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, National Cybersecurity Awareness Month is celebrating its 15th year since inception. Homeland Security provides a toolkit that discusses resources and how to engage various stakeholders on the importance of cybersecurity. 

Blog post Jon Schmidt-DavisDirector, SREB Learning-Centered Leadership Program Kirsten Sundell

Unsung Heroes of America’s Schools
Assistant principals are critical to school success

Michelle Lampert

Assistant principals supervise the hallways and the lunchrooms. They observe teachers and coordinate testing. They serve as the first line of response for discipline referrals, guide wayward students with humor and compassion — and do their best to make their principals look good.

It’s a lot, but most assistant principals truly love their jobs and know that what they do is critical to their school’s success.

Blog post Guest post by Education First

How States Can Get Teacher Evaluation Systems Right
Insights from our partners at Education First

High-quality teacher evaluations are an important component of comprehensive systems to ensure that all students are being taught by effective teachers. From evaluations, districts and states can generate data that can positively impact teachers and students in numerous ways. This is why states have invested so much in them – since 2009, 37 states have updated their evaluation systems – and why they are so important to get right.

Blog post Grad | Logic blog

It’s All About Community
An interview with Ansley Abraham

What’s the best advice to propel a doctoral candidate toward a successful completion of their Ph.D. goal? According to Dr. Ansley Abraham, director of the SREB-State Doctoral Scholars Program, it boils down to connecting with “people who are vested in your success.” 

Dr. Abraham has been doling out that advice to doctoral students for over 25 years. In the article below, originally published on the blog – Grad | Logic: Navigating the Ups and Downs of Graduate School, Dr. Abraham shared some of his wisdom in an interview with Dr. Chris Golde.