Accountability

Overview

Accountability

Why Focus on State Accountability Systems?

Accountability systems are an important part of state efforts to increase student achievement. States use accountability systems to articulate their goals and priorities for public education, report publicly on school performance, and shape their work with districts, schools and educators. Schools and districts use accountability systems to identify their strengths and challenges and focus their continuous improvement efforts.

In 2015, the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) replaced the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001 as the latest reauthorized version of the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

ESSA maintains some of the basic requirements for state accountability systems under NCLB. For example, states must still

  • establish student learning standards in English language arts (ELA), math, science and English language proficiency for English learners;
  • assess students annually in ELA and math in grades three through eight and once in high school, and in science once in grades three through five, six through nine, and 10 through 12; and
  • report school performance ratings annually.

ESSA gives states flexibility in shaping many aspects of their systems. For example, states largely establish their own

  • long-term goals and timeframes for meeting their goals;
  • indicators of school performance and annual targets for schools; 
  • values for school performance indicators within the framework for determining school performance ratings;
  • criteria for identifying schools in need of support and systems for supporting those schools; and
  • system for reporting publicly on school performance.

The state profiles and introduction to regional trends distill information about key components of state accountability systems in all SREB Region states.

State policymakers and state education agencies, district and school leaders, and other stakeholders can use these reports to understand state accountability systems, and inform efforts to continually improve accountability, practice and outcomes for students.

Access each state’s profile by clicking on the map above. In early 2018, SREB will release a report that will provide detailed analysis of trends in the state accountability systems. 

Overview of State Profiles and Research Methods

State Profiles

Each state profile summarizes four key components of the state accountability system under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). 

  1. Long-term goals: What long-term goals did the state set for improving schools?
  2. School performance indicators: What indicators of school performance does the state use?  
  3. Annual meaningful differentiation: How does the state differentiate school performance? Additionally, how does the state assign value to school performance indicators in determining school ratings, and report student subgroup performance?
  4. Support for schools: What categories of schools does the state identify? Additionally, when does the state begin identifying schools in need of improvement, what criteria does the state use to identify the schools, what support does it provide them and how does it determine when they no longer need support?   

Additionally, at the top of each state’s profile, SREB highlights the state’s goals and indicators for college and career readiness.

Access each state’s profile by clicking on the map above. 

These reports reflect information SREB staff gathered as of December 1, 2017. SREB staff will update the reports when states finalize their accountability systems.

Research Methods

SREB benchmarking readiness project staff reviewed the plans states submitted in 2017 to the U.S. Department of Education (US ED) for approval.

SREB staff developed a profile for all 16 SREB Region states: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia.

SREB staff used structured protocols to gather consistent information from all states. To ensure the accuracy of the information in the profiles, SREB staff consulted representatives in the state education agencies. Thirteen state education agencies sent feedback. 

These reports reflect information SREB staff gathered as of December 1, 2017. SREB staff will update the profiles when states finalize their accountability systems. In early 2018, SREB will release a regional report that will provide detailed analysis of trends in the state accountability systems.

Introduction to Regional Trends: Goals

As required by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), all SREB states set goals for academic achievement in English language arts (ELA) and math, high school graduation rates and English language proficiency for English learners.

Six SREB states went beyond the requirements of ESSA and established one or more goals for student college and career readiness. See Table 1.

Table 1 State goals for college and career readiness

State Goals for College and Career Readiness

AL

  • By 2030, 94 percent of high school graduates will earn at least one college- and career-readiness indicator, such as attaining college credit or a career and technical education industry credential

OK

  • By 2025, state postsecondary remediation rates will decline by 50 percent
  • By 2025, 100 percent of students in grades six through 12 will develop an individual career academic plan

SC

  • By 2035, 90 percent of high school graduates will be college and career ready
  • Beginning 2020, high school graduates exempted from postsecondary remediation will increase 5 percent annually

TN

  • By 2020, the state will reach a target average ACT composite score of 21
  • By 2020, majority of high school graduates will earn a postsecondary credential

TX

  • By 2030, 60 percent of Texans aged 25 to 34 will possess a postsecondary credential
  • By 2032, 60 percent of students will meet grade level on ELA and math tests

WV

  • By 2030, 80 percent of K-12 students will reach ELA and math proficiency rates correlated to college and career readiness

 

Read more about these and other state goals in the state profiles. Access state profiles by clicking on the map above.

These reports reflect information SREB staff gathered as of December 1, 2017. SREB staff will update the reports when states finalize their accountability systems.

In early 2018, SREB will release a regional report that will provide detailed analysis of trends in the state accountability systems, including trends in the goals states set.

Introduction to Regional Trends: Indicators of School Performance

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requires states to establish the following five types of indicators of school performance.

For all schools

  1. Academic achievement as measured by proficiency on state assessments of English language arts (ELA) and math
  2. English language proficiency for English learners
  3. School quality or student success. States can design the indicator to reflect the state’s unique local context and areas of focus. The indicator can focus on things such as school climate and safety, student engagement, and college and career readiness.

For elementary and middle grades schools − also

  1. Other academic indicator. States must establish a measure of their choice to track student achievement beyond proficiency in ELA and math − for example student growth. 

For high schools − also

  1. Graduation rate. States must base this indicator on the four-year adjusted cohort rate. States may also measure extended-year adjusted cohort rates.

Four states include one or more additional types of indicators not required by ESSA

  • Georgia, Kentucky and Texas include an indicator of achievement gap closure to track school progress in closing disparities between subgroups of students.
  • Texas includes an indicator of relative performance to gauge student achievement compared to schools with similar demographics.
  • Maryland includes an indicator gauging high school student readiness for postsecondary success.

Other states may have similar measures in their accountability system, but they place the measures within ESSA-required indicator categories. For example, many states track student readiness for postsecondary success – as does Maryland in its readiness for postsecondary success indicator – but they include the measures within their school quality or student success indicator.

Fifteen states include one or more measures of college and career readiness in their school performance indicators. 

Read about each state’s indicators in the profiles. Access the profiles by clicking on the desired state in the map above.

These reports reflect information SREB staff gathered as of December 1, 2017. SREB staff will update the reports when states finalize their accountability systems.

In early 2018, SREB will release a regional report that will provide detailed analysis of trends in the state accountability systems, including trends in the school performance indicators states selected.

Introduction to Regional Trends: Differentiating School Performance

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requires that states use their performance indicators to differentiate the performance of all schools and to report performance for all students and all student subgroups. How states value their school performance indicators within the system for determining school ratings signals the relative importance of each indicator. 

States have flexibility in assigning the relative value, or weight, to their indicators so long as their indicators of academic achievement, graduation rate and English language proficiency progress together receive much greater weight than their school quality or student success indicators. 

See the descriptions below of the frameworks states use to determine and report publicly on school performance ratings, and the ways states assign value to their indicators in assessing school performance.

Frameworks for differentiating and reporting on school performance

Fourteen states − all but Virginia and West Virginia − assign schools an overall performance rating. Ratings include the following four types.

  • Letter grades: Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas
  • Descriptive labels: Delaware, South Carolina
  • Numeric ratings: Arkansas, Georgia 
  • Stars: Kentucky, Maryland

All SREB states assign ratings at the indicator level, to provide detail about areas of school strengths and challenges. Ratings include the following three types.

  • Numeric ratings: Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi and Virginia
  • Letter grades: Alabama, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Texas
  • Descriptive ratings: Kentucky, South Carolina and West Virginia

Nine states assign indicator ratings to each individual indicator. Seven states – Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, North Carolina, Texas and Virginia − combine two or more indicators and assign a rating to the combined indicators.  

Relative value of performance indicators in determining school ratings

How states value their school performance indicators within the system for determining and reporting on school ratings signals the relative importance of each indicator.

SREB states use three different approaches to assigning value, or weight, to school performance indicators within the state system for assessing school performance.

  • Ten states assign percentages of the total weight to the indicators.
  • Four states award certain numbers of the total possible points to the indicators − Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi and Oklahoma.
  • Texas and Virginia each use a unique approach to assign weight to the indicators.

Read more in each state’s profile about the state’s framework for differentiating and reporting on school status, the values of school performance indicators, and how the state uses student subgroups in its ratings and reporting. Access the profiles by clicking on the desired state in the map above.

These reports reflect information SREB staff gathered as of December 1, 2017. SREB staff will update the reports when states finalize their accountability systems.

In early 2018, SREB will release a regional report that will provide detailed analysis of trends in the state accountability systems, including state frameworks for differentiating and reporting on school performance, values of indicators and treatment of subgroups within the systems.

Introduction to Regional Trends: Supporting Schools

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requires that states establish a methodology for identifying and serving low-performing schools. States must identify two categories of schools at least once every three years: those that need Comprehensive Support and Improvement (CSI) and those that need Targeted Support and Improvement (TSI). States may also establish additional categories of schools, for example, those not in need of improvement.

How and when schools are identified

ESSA requires states to identify as CSI at least the lowest-performing 5 percent of Title I schools and any high school failing to graduate one-third or more of its students. States may establish additional criteria to identify CSI schools.

Thirteen states begin identifying CSI schools in 2018-19. Louisiana, South Carolina and Tennessee begin identifying CSI schools in 2017-18. 

ESSA requires states to identify as TSI schools with consistently underperforming subgroups. States establish their own definition of “consistently underperforming.”

Louisiana begins identifying TSI schools in 2017-18. Four states – Delaware, Florida, Mississippi and Tennessee− begin identifying TSI schools in 2018-19.  Six states – Alabama, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Virginia – begin identifying TSI schools in 2019-20. Arkansas, Kentucky and South Carolina begin doing so in 2020-21.

Seven states also use the flexibility granted to states by ESSA to identify other categories of schools in addition to CSI and TSI. Alabama, Delaware, Georgia, Maryland, Mississippi, Oklahoma and Tennessee will each identify one or more additional types of schools, for example, schools not in need of improvement and schools at risk of becoming CSI and TSI.

Serving schools

Under ESSA, the state education agency (SEA) must notify local education agencies (LEA) of identified CSI and TSI schools. LEAs take the lead in supporting the schools. SEAs provide LEAs with technical assistance and support. ESSA gives states flexibility, within a few parameters, to determine the kinds and extent of assistance and support they provide to LEAs and schools.   

The types and amount of services and support that states provide to LEAs and schools varies, as does the specificity with which the states describe their plans to provide the services and resources.

Read in each state’s profile about the state’s criteria for identifying schools as CSI and TSI, criteria for exiting schools from CSI and TSI status, and the assistance and support the state provides to LEAs and schools. Access the profiles by clicking on the desired state in the map above.

These reports reflect information SREB staff gathered as of December 1, 2017. SREB staff will update the reports when states finalize their accountability systems.

In early 2018, SREB will release a regional report that will provide detailed analysis of trends in the state accountability systems, including state criteria for identifying and exiting schools from CSI and TSI status, and state systems for serving districts and schools.

Moving Forward: Recommendations for Using State Accountability Systems as Effective Drivers of Continuous Improvement

In 2017-18, states begin implementation of their accountability systems under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). As states move forward with implementation, state leaders have much work to do, including addressing the following challenges.

  • Finalizing elements of their accountability system. For example, some states have new statewide assessments and have been waiting to set annual interim targets for some school performance indicators until they have more than one year of baseline data.
  • Fine-tuning the state’s approach to serving schools in need of support and improvement. For example, some states may have to adjust the types and amounts of assistance and support the state education agency provides, based on how many schools meet the criteria in the state’s plan for identification as Comprehensive Support and Improvement (CSI) and Targeted Support and Improvement (TSI).   
  • Updating reporting systems. Many states need to update or redesign their online reporting system according to the state’s new accountability system under ESSA.
  • Continuing to engage stakeholders. ESSA required that states plan their new accountability systems with meaningful input from stakeholders, such as the governor, members of the state legislature, the state board of education, local educational agencies, educators, school leaders, parents and community leaders.  As states implement their plans, they should consider how to continue and increase their collaboration with stakeholders to ensure that all with a vested interest in public education understand the accountability system and can use the system to improve their work.   

These reports reflect information SREB staff gathered as of December 1, 2017. SREB staff will update the reports when states finalize their accountability systems.

In early 2018, SREB will release a regional report that will provide detailed analysis of trends in the new state accountability systems, and recommendations for addressing challenges to make the systems effective tools for communication, collaboration and continuous improvement.

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Weights assigned to each indicator in West Virginia - Elementary and Middle Grades (29% School Quality or Student Success / 28% Academic Achievement / 28% Other Academic Indicator / 14% English Language Proficiency Progress) and High Schools (22% Academic Achievement (English Language Arts and Math) / 22% Academic Achievement (Progress) / 22% Graduation Rate / 22% School Quality or Student Success / 11% English Language Proficiency Progress)

West Virginia – Accountability

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. ESSA requires states to submit plans to the U.S. Department of Education (US ED) describing the state systems for evaluating school performance and holding schools accountable for improvement. States could submit their plans to the US ED by either April 3 or September 18, 2017. After receiving feedback on their plans from the US ED, states finalize their plans. State accountability systems take effect in school year 2017-18.

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Virginia – Accountability

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. ESSA requires states to submit plans to the U.S. Department of Education (US ED) describing the state systems for evaluating school performance and holding schools accountable for improvement. States could submit their plans to the US ED by either April 3 or September 18, 2017. After receiving feedback on their plans from the US ED, states finalize their plans. State accountability systems take effect in school year 2017-18.

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Texas – Accountability

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. ESSA requires states to submit plans to the U.S. Department of Education (US ED) describing the state systems for evaluating school performance and holding schools accountable for improvement. States could submit their plans to the US ED by either April 3 or September 18, 2017. After receiving feedback on their plans from the US ED, states finalize their plans. State accountability systems take effect in school year 2017-18.

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Weights assigned to each indicator in Tennessee - Elementary and Middle Grades (45% Academic Achievement / 35% Other Academic Indicator / 10% School Quality or Student Success / 10% English Language Proficiency Progress) and High Schools (30% Academic Achievement (English Language Arts, Math and Science) / 30% School Quality or Student Success / 25% Academic Achievement (Student Growth) / 10% English Language Proficiency Progress / 5% Graduation Rate)

Tennessee – Accountability

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. ESSA requires states to submit plans to the U.S. Department of Education (US ED) describing the state systems for evaluating school performance and holding schools accountable for improvement. States could submit their plans to the US ED by either April 3 or September 18, 2017. After receiving feedback on their plans from the US ED, states finalize their plans. State accountability systems take effect in school year 2017-18.

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Weights assigned to each indicator in South Carolina - Elementary and Middle Grades (35% Academic Achievement / 35% Other Academic Indicator / 20% School Quality or Student Success / 10% English Language Proficiency Progress) and High Schools (40% School Quality or Student Success / 25% Academic Achievement / 25% Graduation Rate / 10% English Language Proficiency Progress)

South Carolina – Accountability

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. ESSA requires states to submit plans to the U.S. Department of Education (US ED) describing the state systems for evaluating school performance and holding schools accountable for improvement. States could submit their plans to the US ED by either April 3 or September 18, 2017. After receiving feedback on their plans from the US ED, states finalize their plans. State accountability systems take effect in school year 2017-18.

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Weights assigned to each indicator in Oklahoma - Elementary and Middle Schools (35 Academic Achievement / 30 Other Academic Indicator / 15 English Language Proficiency Progress / 10 School Quality or Student Success) and High Schools (45 Academic Achievement / 20 School Quality or Student Success / 15 English Language Proficiency Progress / 10 Graduation Rate)

Oklahoma – Accountability

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. ESSA requires states to submit plans to the U.S. Department of Education (US ED) describing the state systems for evaluating school performance and holding schools accountable for improvement. States could submit their plans to the US ED by either April 3 or September 18, 2017. After receiving feedback on their plans from the US ED, states finalize their plans. State accountability systems take effect in school year 2017-18.

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Weights assigned to each indicator in North Carolina - Elementary and Middle Grades (80% Academic Achievement, Other Academic Indicator and English Language Proficiency Progress / 20% School Quality or Student Success) and High Schools (80% Academic Achievement (English Language Arts and Math), English Language Proficiency Progress, Graduation Rate, and School Quality or Student Success / 20% Academic Achievement (Student Growth))

North Carolina – Accountability

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. ESSA requires states to submit plans to the U.S. Department of Education (US ED) describing the state systems for evaluating school performance and holding schools accountable for improvement. States could submit their plans to the US ED by either April 3 or September 18, 2017. After receiving feedback on their plans from the US ED, states finalize their plans. State accountability systems take effect in school year 2017-18.

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Weights assigned to each indicator in Mississippi - Elementary and Middle Grades (300 Other Academic Indicator / 200 Academic Achievement / 200 School Quality or Student Success) and High Schools (300 School Quality or Student Success / 300 Academic Achievement (Student Growth), and Academic Achievement (Science and Social Studies) / 200 Academic Achievement (English Language Arts and Math) / 200 Graduation Rate)

Mississippi – Accountability

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. ESSA requires states to submit plans to the U.S. Department of Education (US ED) describing the state systems for evaluating school performance and holding schools accountable for improvement. States could submit their plans to the US ED by either April 3 or September 18, 2017. After receiving feedback on their plans from the US ED, states finalize their plans. State accountability systems take effect in school year 2017-18.

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Weights assigned to each indicator in Maryland - Elementary and Middle Grades (35% Other Academic Indicator / 35% School Quality or Student Success / 20% Academic Achievement / 10% English Language Proficiency Progress) and High Schools (35% School Quality or Student Success / 20% Academic Achievement / 20% Readiness for Postsecondary Success / 15% Graduation Rate / 10% English Language Proficiency Progress)

Maryland – Accountability

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. ESSA requires states to submit plans to the U.S. Department of Education (US ED) describing the state systems for evaluating school performance and holding schools accountable for improvement. States could submit their plans to the US ED by either April 3 or September 18, 2017. After receiving feedback on their plans from the US ED, states finalize their plans. State accountability systems take effect in school year 2017-18.

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Weights assigned to each indicator in Louisiana - Elementary Schools (50% Academic Achievement and English Language Proficiency Progress / 25% Other Academic Indicator / 25% School Quality or Student Success), Middle Grades (46.67% Academic Achievement and English Language Proficiency Progress / 28.33% School Quality or Student Success / 25% Other Academic Indicator) and High Schools (41.67% Graduation Rate / 37.5% School Quality or Student Success / 20.83% Academic Achievement and English Language Proficiency Progress)

Louisiana – Accountability

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. ESSA requires states to submit plans to the U.S. Department of Education (US ED) describing the state systems for evaluating school performance and holding schools accountable for improvement. States could submit their plans to the US ED by either April 3 or September 18, 2017. After receiving feedback on their plans from the US ED, states finalize their plans. State accountability systems take effect in school year 2017-18.

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Weights assigned to each indicator in Kentucky - Elementary and Middle Grades (30 Other Academic Indicator (Student Growth) and English Language Proficiency Progress / 25 Achievement Gap Closure / 25 Academic Achievement / 25 Science and Social Studies / 20 School Quality or Student Success / 10 Other Academic Indicator (Transition Readiness)) and High Schools (30 Academic Achievement (Transition Readiness) and English Language Proficiency Progress / 25 Achievement Gap Closure / 20 Academic Achievement (Reading, Writing and Math) / 20 Science and Social Studies / 20 School Quality or Student Success / 15 Gradation Rate)

Kentucky – Accountability

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. ESSA requires states to submit plans to the U.S. Department of Education (US ED) describing the state systems for evaluating school performance and holding schools accountable for improvement. States could submit their plans to the US ED by either April 3 or September 18, 2017. After receiving feedback on their plans from the US ED, states finalize their plans. State accountability systems take effect in school year 2017-18.

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Weights assigned to each indicator in Georgia - Elementary and Middle Grades (35% Other Academic Indicator and English Language Proficiency Progress / 30% Academic Achievement / 20% School Quality or Student Success / 15% Closing Gaps) and High Schools (30% Academic Achievement (Student Growth) and English Language Proficiency Progress / 30% Academic Achievement (English Language Arts, Math, Science and Social Studies) / 15% School Quality or Student Success / 15% Graduation Rate / 10% Closing Gaps)

Georgia – Accountability

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. ESSA requires states to submit plans to the U.S. Department of Education (US ED) describing the state systems for evaluating school performance and holding schools accountable for improvement. States could submit their plans to the US ED by either April 3 or September 18, 2017. After receiving feedback on their plans from the US ED, states finalize their plans. State accountability systems take effect in school year 2017-18.

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Weights assigned to each indicator in Florida - Elementary Schools (400 Other Academic Indicator (Academic Progress) / 200 Academic Achievement / 100 School Quality or Student Success), Middle Grades (400 Other Academic Indicator (Academic Progress) / 300 School Quality or Student Success / 200 Academic Achievement) and High Schools (400 Academic Achievement (Student Growth) / 300 School Quality or Student Success / 200 Academic Achievement (English Language Arts and Math) / 100 Graduation Rate)

Florida – Accountability

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. ESSA requires states to submit plans to the U.S. Department of Education (US ED) describing the state systems for evaluating school performance and holding schools accountable for improvement. States could submit their plans to the US ED by either April 3 or September 18, 2017. After receiving feedback on their plans from the US ED, states finalize their plans. State accountability systems take effect in school year 2017-18.

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Weights assigned to each indicator in Delaware - Elementary and Middle Grades (40% Other Academic Indicator / 30% Academic Achievement / 20% School Quality or Student Success / 10% English Language Proficiency Progress) and High Schools (40% Academic Achievement / 35% School Quality or Student Success / 15% Graduation Rate / 10% English Language Proficiency Progress)

Delaware – Accountability

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. ESSA requires states to submit plans to the U.S. Department of Education (US ED) describing the state systems for evaluating school performance and holding schools accountable for improvement. States could submit their plans to the US ED by either April 3 or September 18, 2017. After receiving feedback on their plans from the US ED, states finalize their plans. State accountability systems take effect in school year 2017-18.

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Weights assigned to each indicator in Arkansas - Elementary and Middle Grades (50% Other Academic Indicator and English Language Proficiency Progress / 35% Academic Achievement / 15% School Quality or Student Success) and High Schools (35% Academic Achievement (Student Growth) and English Language Proficiency Progress / 35% Academic Achievement (English Language Arts and Math) / 15% School Quality or Student Success / 15% Graduation Rate)

Arkansas – Accountability

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. ESSA requires states to submit plans to the U.S. Department of Education (US ED) describing the state systems for evaluating school performance and holding schools accountable for improvement. States could submit their plans to the US ED by either April 3 or September 18, 2017. After receiving feedback on their plans from the US ED, states finalize their plans. State accountability systems take effect in school year 2017-18.

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Weights assigned to each indicator in Alabama - Elementary and Middle Grades (40% Academic Achievement / 40% Academic Indicator / 15% School Quality or Student Success / 5% English Language Proficiency Progress) and High Schools (30% Graduation Rate / 25% Academic Achievement Student Growth / 20% Academic Achievement English Language Arts and Math / 20% School Quality or Student Success / 5% English Language Proficiency Progress)

Alabama – Accountability

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is the latest reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. ESSA requires states to submit plans to the U.S. Department of Education (US ED) describing the state systems for evaluating school performance and holding schools accountable for improvement. States could submit their plans to the US ED by either April 3 or September 18, 2017. After receiving feedback on their plans from the US ED, states finalize their plans. State accountability systems take effect in school year 2017-18.