Definitions for College and Career Readiness

Overview

College and Career Readiness Definitions

Most SREB states define college and career readiness. Some states have separate definitions for each. While states continue to focus on postsecondary readiness for their students, SREB encourages state development of separate and thorough definitions for both college readiness and career readiness to help guide appropriate goals and policies. (Updated August, 2017)

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Alabama
College and Career Readiness Definitions

Alabama defines a college- and career-ready graduate as a student who possesses the knowledge and skills needed to enroll and succeed in credit-bearing, first-year courses in a two- or four-year college, trade school, or technical school without the need for remediation and possesses the ability to apply core academic skills to real-world situations through collaboration with peers in problem solving, utilizing precision and punctuality in delivery of a product, and demonstrating the desire to be a life-long learner.

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Arkansas
College and Career Readiness Definitions

The acquisition of the knowledge and skills a student needs to be successful in all future endeavors including credit-bearing, first-year courses at a postsecondary institution (such as a two-or four-year college, trade school, or technical school) or to embark successfully on a chosen career.

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Delaware
College and Career Readiness Definitions

Each Delaware student will graduate ready for college and career. Students will be prepared to successfully plan and pursue an education and career path aligned to their personal goals, with the ability to adapt and innovate as demands change. Students will graduate with strong academic knowledge, the behaviors and skills with which to apply their knowledge, and the ability to collaborate and communicate effectively. Each student will exhibit the behaviors of an independent learner, and have respect for a diverse society and a commitment to responsible citizenship.

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Florida
College and Career Readiness Definitions

Students are considered college and career ready when they have the knowledge, skills, and academic preparation needed to enroll and succeed in introductory college credit-bearing courses within an associate or baccalaureate degree program without the need for remediation. These same attributes and levels of achievement are needed for entry into and success in postsecondary workforce education or directly into a job that offers gainful employment and career advancement.

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Georgia
College and Career Readiness Definitions

The level of achievement required in order for a student to enroll in two- or four-year colleges and universities and technical colleges without remediation, fully prepared for college-level work and careers. This means that all students graduate from high school with both rigorous content knowledge and the ability to apply that knowledge.

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Kentucky
College and Career Readiness Definitions

College readiness is the level of preparation a student needs to succeed in credit-bearing courses in college. ‘Succeed’ is defined as completing entry-level courses at a level of understanding and proficiency that prepares the student for subsequent courses. Kentucky’s system-wide standards of readiness guarantee students access to credit-bearing coursework without the need for remediation in high school or college coursework or intervention programming.

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Maryland
College and Career Readiness Definitions

College- and career-readiness includes mastery of rigorous content knowledge and the abilities to apply that knowledge through higher-order skills to demonstrate success in college and careers. This includes the ability to think critically and solve problems, communicate effectively, work collaboratively, and be self-directed in the learning process. More specifically, a student who is college- and career-ready should: be prepared to succeed in credit-bearing postsecondary introductory general education courses or in industry certification programs without needing remediation; be competent in the Skills for Success (SFS) (includes learning, thinking, communication, technology, and interpersonal skills.); have identified potential career goal(s) and understand the steps to achieve them; and be skilled enough in communication to seek assistance as needed, including student financial assistance.

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North Carolina
College and Career Readiness Definitions

In North Carolina, students are considered career and college ready when they have the knowledge and academic preparation needed to enroll and succeed, without the need for remediation, in introductory college credit-bearing courses in English language arts and mathematics within an associate or baccalaureate degree program. These same attributes and levels of achievement are needed for entry into and success in postsecondary workforce education, the military, or directly into a job that offers gainful employment and career advancement.

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Oklahoma
College and Career Readiness Definitions

Each student graduating with a diploma from an Oklahoma public school will be ready for college or career without the need for remediation and will be citizen ready, meaning they will know something about our government and the history of our nation.

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South Carolina
College and Career Readiness Definitions

The South Carolina Department of Education adopted college- and career- ready standards effective for the 2015-2016 school year. South Carolina requires that all 11th grade students take ACT WorkKeys. Further, to earn a South Carolina high school diploma, students are required to pass a high school credit course in science and United States history and four gateway courses (English, math, science and social studies) in which a state authorized end-of-course examination, aligned to the South Carolina College and Career Ready Standards, is administered. End-of-course examinations comprise 20 percent of the student’s final course grade.

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Texas
College and Career Readiness Definitions

College readiness is the level of preparation a student must attain in English language arts and mathematics courses to enroll and succeed, without remediation, in an entry-level general education course for credit in that same content area for a baccalaureate degree or associate degree program. It should be noted, however, that the measurement of college readiness through the Algebra II and English III assessments will be only one piece of information that students, parents, and schools will have in making readiness determinations. Algebra II and English III are courses students typically take in grade 11; after students have taken these assessments and potentially met the college-readiness performance standards, they will continue to take higher-level courses (i.e., calculus and English IV) in grade 12. Students will need to continue to acquire content knowledge and perform at a high level in these courses to fully prepare for postsecondary activities.

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West Virginia
College and Career Readiness Definitions

College and Career Readiness means that students exit high school prepared for success in a wide range of high-quality post-secondary opportunities. Specifically, college and career readiness refers to the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed to be successful in postsecondary education and/or training that lead to gainful employment. Today’s workplace requires that all workers be lifelong learners in order to advance in their careers. Therefore, it is necessary that there be a common set of knowledge and skills that all individuals acquire to successfully transition into postsecondary education or the workplace. As individuals select specific career paths, they will then have to focus on the amount and type of additional knowledge and skills they should acquire to be successful in their chosen field.

A student’s goals, desires, and interests influence the precise knowledge and skill profile necessary to be ready for success in their chosen postsecondary endeavors and the level of postsecondary education needed to accomplish a student’s individual career aspirations. All students should exit high school with a full understanding of the career opportunities available to them, the education necessary to be successful in their chosen pathway, and a plan to attain their goals.

College readiness involves being prepared to enroll in and successfully complete entry-level, credit-bearing, academic collegiate programs at two- and four-year postsecondary schools without remedial work or assistance, as well as being equipped with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to make that transition successfully. This entails having mastered rigorous content knowledge, demonstrated ability to apply knowledge through higher-order skills and the ability to navigate the pathways and systems that will gain access to positive postsecondary opportunities.

Knowledge and Skills

A college-ready person is proficient in the core academic subjects, as well as in specialized topics in their selected areas of interests. This foundational knowledge base includes competence in a broad range of academic subjects grounded in rigorous internationally benchmarked standards. Prerequisite skills and capabilities include, but are not limited to, proficiency in reading a range and type of material, with an emphasis on informational texts; fluent writing in several modes, most notably expository, descriptive and argumentative; quantitative literacy through algebra and including geometry, combined with the ability to understand and interpret data; a understanding of the scientific method and some insight into the organization of knowledge in the sciences; an awareness of how social systems operate and how they are studied; basic proficiency in a second language and awareness that languages reflect cultures; and experiences in and appreciation of creative and expressive arts. While not every person needs exactly the same proficiency in each of these areas, as student’s interests influence the precise knowledge and skill profile necessary for postsecondary studies.

Career readiness involves three major areas: core academic skills and the ability to apply those skills in concrete situations in order to function in the workplace and in routine daily activities; employability skills (such as critical thinking and responsibility) that are essential in any career area; and technical, job-specific skills related to a specific career pathway. These skills allow students to enter true career pathways that offer gainful employment and opportunities for advancement.

Knowledge and Skills

A career-ready person is proficient in the core academic subjects, as well as in technical topics. This foundational knowledge base includes competence in a broad range of rigorous internationally benchmarked standards. It also includes a level of technical-skill proficiency aligned to a chosen career field and pathway, and the ability to apply both academic and technical learning in the context of a career.

Dispositions

While there may be specific dispositions necessary for individual careers, the basic dispositions for postsecondary success are essentially the same for both college and career readiness. Supported by research as strongly predictive of academic and lifelong success, these dispositions can be defined broadly as:

 

        Self-efficacy

        Initiative

        Integrity

        Intellectual Curiosity

        Adaptability

        Time and Goal Management

        Leadership

        Ethical Decision Making and Social Responsibility

        Resilience

        Collaboration

        Working in Teams and Independently

        Clear and Effective Communication

        Problem Solving

        Critical Thinking

        Self-Awareness

        Self-Control

        Applied Knowledge

        Social and Personal Responsibility